About your Search

20130801
20130831
SHOW
News 71
Hannity 37
Cavuto 33
( more )
STATION
MSNBCW 436
FOXNEWSW 416
MSNBC 184
CNNW 170
CSPAN 150
FOXNEWS 150
FBC 135
ALJAZAM 86
CSPAN2 86
CNN 59
CNBC 56
KPIX (CBS) 47
KGO (ABC) 43
KNTV (NBC) 41
KQED (PBS) 40
CURRENT 36
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 2369
French 6
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,381 (some duplicates have been removed)
washington works, someone who has these relationships, someone who can get on the phone and get the president of the united states to pardon, you know, your fugitive client, that's a very, very marketable commodity. i mean, if you see -- if you are seen as someone who knows how this town works, someone who is a usual suspect in this town, you can dine out for years. that's why no one leaves. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information a
at film from august of 1963 as demonstration and marchers gathered on the mall here in washington d.c. this was the headline from the washington post, a mammoth rally of 200,000 jamming the mall in a solemn orderly plea for equality. that's our line for those of you over the age of 50. for those of you under the age of 50. 585-3880. 202 is the area code here in washington d.c. we'll get your call on march. >> your calls and comments in a moment. lots get to the other stories this morning that is latest development from syria and headlines from overseas. the guardian newspaper the attack on syria just days away as the house of commons recalled for a vote and the picture of the british prime minster as he departs yesterday as the parliament resuming session tomorrow breaking from their august recess. from the marine herald, -- miami herald, a stage is set. u.s. and allies act as syria's intelligence mount. as u.s. officials said privately that a flood of previously undisclosed intelligence including satellite images and intercepted communication erased last minute administration doubt
and terror threats facing our nation. was this the right venue to make news? "the washington post" gets bought by amazon billionaire jeff bazzos. how did the media react to the news? what will this mean for the future of the newspaper business? >> you have the republican chairman -- i would say understandably miffed about these hillary clinton film. >> even some folks at nbc against the peacock plan to produce a miniseries about hillary clinton to run before she runs for president. and the head of the rmc takes a stand. demanding nbc and cnn drop their clinton projects. how will this fall in? >>> oprah speaks out about the trayvon martin shooting. did her words help or hurt racial tensions? democrats have become the targets of late night jokes. >> yesterday was the president's birthday. he didn't let work get in the way of having a good time. take a look at this speech. >> you will interact with americans from all walks of life because -- our citizens can learn from you, too. >> judy miller, columnist and fox news contributor and jim pinkerton be contributing editor of the american cons
in washington. it was an absolute shock. >> this week on "inside washington" -- the shocker, "the washington post" sold. another victim of the changing media universe. >> i do not subscribe to anything anymore. i read everything online. >> president obama cancels a summit with vladimir putin. >> there have been times they slide back into cold war thinking. >> a terror threat closes u.s. embassies. >> this group is fairly ingenious, bold and eager to cause damage. >> the president targets fannie mae and freddie mac. also, hillary, the documentary, the miniseries, and reince priebus, the angry chairman. >> i will not expose our candidates to this kind of treatment. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> the name of the program is "inside washington" and if there is a bigger story in washington than the sale of "the washington post," i cannot think of one. we have colby king, lois romano, a "the washington post" veteran. charles krauthammer.part of the "washington post" writers group. i came to washington to work for broadcast properties, which were owned by "the w
sort out the details tonight on "washington week." who's listening in? >> i want to make clear. once again. that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. i don't think mr. snowden was a patriot. gwen: how dangerous is al qaeda? >> this is an ongoing process. we are not going to completely eliminate terrorism. gwen: how frosty are things with russia? >> i think there's always been some tension in the u.s.-russian relationship after the fall of the soviet union. gwen: and how frosty are things with congress? >> we're not in a normal atmosphere around here when it comes to "obamacare." gwen: these issues and more will follow the president as he leaves on vacation. we take a look with doyle mcmanus of the "los angeles times." martha raddatz of abc news. and alexis simendinger of realclearpolitics. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens, live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week with gwen ifill." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we went out and asked people a simple question -- how old is the oldest
as natural, and that is no longer in existence. >> amazon.com founder jeff bezos purchases the washington post. year, amazon inked a $600 million cloud computing deal with the cia. now the founder owns the most important newspaper in washington. we will speak to media critics as well as book publisher dennis johnson. >> in the view of american publishers, they are a threat. they have been discounting books so severely they have done great damage to the markets and publishers have been really struggling as to how to control that. >> we will also speak to mother jones reporter mac mcclelland, author of "i was a warehouse wage slave: my brief, backbreaking, rage-inducing, low-paying, dildo-packing time inside the online-shipping machine." welcome to democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. yemeni officials claim to have foiled a plot to blow up key oil locations. officials say the motives of the planned attack appears to be retaliation for the u.s. killing a deputyal-shihri, health today in the arabian peninsula. a military jet has reduced the maximum poss
. was this right venue to make news. "washington post" gets bought by amazon billionaire jeff bezos. how did the read yeah react to the news. what would it mean to the future of the newspaper business. >> we have a republican chairman understandably miffed. >> folks are against the nbc's plan to produce a mini series about hillary clinton's run before she runs for president. and head of rnc demands both nbc and cnn drop their clinton projects. how will it all end? oprah speaks out about the trayvon martin shooting. did her words help or hurt racial tensions? and democrats have become the targets of late night jokes. >> it was the president's birthday. look at this recent speech. >> you will interact with all americans of all walks of life because our citizens can learn too. >> kelly: judy miller, jim pinkerton, ellen ratner and affair ard grenell. i'm kelly wright. fox news watch is on right now. >> end of the war in afghanistan doesn't mean the end of threats to our nation. as i said before even as we decimated the al-qaeda leadership that attacked us on 9/11, al-qaeda affiliates and like-m
the anniversary of the "i have a dream" speech and the famous march on washington. that pivotal moment in history signaled a turning point in the nation's civil right movement with a quarter of million people marming for equal rights. as it was back then, many are getting set now to speak out on dr. king's dream. and the movement. the march begins shortly down independence avenue, passing the new martin luther king memorial and winds up at the washington monument. that is where doug mckelway is standing by on what is a gorgeous day in our nation's capital city. hi, doug. >> it is a gorgeous day. a spectacular day for the event today. the march on washington in 1963 was the single largest gathering of people in washington up until that time. i'll let the ambulance pass by here. join me as i step on the curb here. all right. there we go. there have been largeer crowds sincebe that day but up until that time it was the largest crowd. the national park service stopped measuring crowd size since the million man march because they were criticized to overestimate size crowd by some groups and underestim
of the nation's leading newspapers to one of the world's richest men. on monday, the washington post announced the paper had been purchased by amazon.com founder and ceo jeff bezos. he will pay $250 million for the paper and a number of other publications, less than 1% of his wealth. of the chiefiend executive of the washington post company, whose family has owned the paper for eight decades. bezos said management would remain the same but it is unclear what changes might be coming. last year, he was quoted in an interview with a german newspaper saying -- >> critics of the sale have cited bezos' close ties to the government. in 2010, amazon pulled the plug on hosting the wikileaks web site. earlier this year, amazon inked a $600 million cloud computing contract with the cia. we are joined by bob mcchesney, author of several books on media and politics, including "digital disconnect: how capitalism is turning the internet against democracy." you can read the first chapter at our website, democracynow.org. he also recently co-authored with john nichols, "dollarocracy: how the money and media el
after dr. king delivered his i have a dream speech, washington and the world will reflect on the work still to be done. meantime, the u.s. and the world allies let syria know that chemical attacks will not be tolerated. we'll get the latest on what kind of military strike could punish assad without somehow swaying the country's civil war. those realities weigh heavily on president obama today when he marks the dream anniversary, honoring the legacy of nonviolence on the eve of an expected u.s.-led military strike. good morning from washington. it's wednesday, august 28th, 2013. this "the daily rundown," i'm chuck todd. let's get right to the first reads of the morning. today is the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. of course dr. martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech before a crowd of a quarter million people in washington and millions more on television watched on that 1963 day. his remarks galvanized the civil rights movement. president obama called it one of the five greatest speeches in american history. >> when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet
? we'll have analysis from raj rajaratnam of the "washington post." eric schmitt of the "new york times." and cbs news state department correspondent margaret brennan. and we'll look at another story that rocked washington, the sale of the "washington post". we'll talk about the future of newspapers with former "washington post" editor len downie. former "new york times" editor bill keller. and john harris, editor in chief of politico. there's a lot to cover, but this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning again, michael hayden who served as both the c.i.a. and n.s.a. director now consulted for the cherdov group here in washington, joins us as our lead guest this morning. general, the president made that news conference on friday, and he said the american people need to know more about what the national security agency is doing because there are a growing number of people in the congress who are wondering is the n.s.a. infringing on americans' right to privacy? what do you think-
the dream and the dreamer 50 years later. >> thousands of people making their way through washington, d.c. for days of festivities marking that historic speech from dr. martin about howg jr. and the march on much this day this movement has changed life for africa americans. what has it meant for if you? >> well, the original march was a turning point for me in my life because it was the first time that i was able to really stand up for what i believed. i knew it was right. i knew it was right to my bones to go to >> yeah 7. >> for his take on today's event gas thevent, for the first timee have whites and blacks in intimate settings, allowed to go to church together, organize together, it was those relationships away from the camera, away from the microphones that allowed folks to get to know each other in ways that they hadn't been able to get to know each other before. >> reporter: mr. neil there is so much emphasis on dr. king, but the movement took place in basements around the countriers people who were afraid they would lose their jobs. >> these are folks who were organizers at the
on washington with those who lived it. >>> yesterday tens of thousands of americans converged on the nation's capital to commemorate the 50 th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. it was a historic event that spurred the enactment of the civil rights and voting rights act and one that is now remembered as one of the moral high points of american history. but that is not what political leaders, major media outlets and millions of everyday americans were expecting right up until that march began in 1963. they were bracing for violence and chaos. they were fearing strident and inflammatory rhetoric and they were convinced the main effect of the rally would be to inflict a grievous wound, maybe even a fatal wound, on a very movement it sought to advance. that is the context in which the march took place 50 years ago this week. context that can and all too often is lost to history. it came at a particularly crucial and politically sensitive time in the civil rights movement. three months before the march, in may of 1963, demonstrations in birmingham -- excuse me, demonstrators in birming
of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream. >> good morning from washington. it's friday august 23, 2013. i'm chuck todd. this is a special edition of "the daily rundown." we're looking ahead to the 50th anniversary of that famous 1963 march on washington. for many americans, 50 years ago feels like yesterday. but of course for millions of others, including myself who weren't even born yet, in an ironic way, the grand memorial of granite and marble that now stands might make that history feel more distant. particularly for many young people today. we remember dr. king's march as an historical event. through grainy film and archive photos. but for each of us, those four words, "i have a dream," have a different and special renaissanreno sans. since then, every political protest in this country has borrowed from what the leaders of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were able to achieve. tomorrow, thousands will retrace their steps. next week, president obama will mark the 50th anniversary of the march with a speech on the steps of the lincoln memorial. i
anniversary of the march on washington. inside story is next. >>> 50 years after the march on washington there are lingering challenges to the modern social justice movement and a modern debathe as to how to accomplish dr. king's dream. this is inside story. hello everybody i'm david shuster, it was called a march for jobs and freedom. hundreds of thousands of peaceful protestors gathered on the national mall and ignited a new conversation about civil rights in america. highlighted by the march and by dr. martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech are still alive today. still ahead, we'll examine inquality and social justice. finally, we'll take you to an organizer who was there. joyce ladner. >> i had a stage pass. no one on that stage had ever seen that many people before. that's the major one memory. i have a lot of others as well. >> was it an energetic crowd? was it a me mesmerized crowd? >> it was a very friendly crowd. it was almost like meeting new friends. it was easy going. it was an easy crowd. >> was there a sense that eventually society would progress and things would ch
to come to washington. there will be those that will miscast this as some great social event. but let us remember 50 years ago some came to washington having rode the back of buses. some came to washington that couldn't stop and buy a cup of coffee until they got across the mason dixon line. some came to washington sleeping in their cars because they couldn't rent a motel room. some came to washington never having had the privilege to vote. some came having seen their friends shed blood. but they came to washington so we could come today in a different time and a different place and we owe them for what we have today. i et a man not long ago, tell it often, he says i'm african american but i don't understand all this civil rights marching you're talking about, reverend al. i've accomplished, i've achieved. look at my resume. i went to the best schools. i'm a member of the right clubs. i had the right people read my resume. civil rights didn't write my resume. i looked at his resume. i said, you're right. civil rights didn't write your resume. but civil rights made somebody ead your resum
approaches this situation is a top priority. "the washington post" published something online that u.s.,s details about the that the budget has grown enormously since 9/11, that the cia is far bigger than outside experts had estimated, that the u.s. is involved in new cyber programs to attack other programs in countries. this information has never been released despite efforts from outside folks. does the president believe this is helpful now and the current climate to have discussion about the details about how the u.s. is spending its money in these departments to get a better understanding, as he said, make the public comfortable with how this money is being spayed and what type of programs are being used? -- that storyhed was published since i walked out here. i'm not in a position to comment on a specific story. the president believes that strengthening public confidence in these programs is important to the success of these programs. there is little debate about the fact these programs are critical to our national security, that they have made a role in protecting the homeland
to make the first march on washington and i never really got over that until president obama said please lead us in the invocation, and that was in january of this year. thank you reverend sharpton and others for asking me to lend a few words to this most precious gatheri gathering as i look out at the crowd, i find myself saying, what are we doing today? where have we come from? what has been accomplished and where do we go from this point forwa forward? i think of one theme that has been played over and over in the past few months and it's one that bring great controversy. stand your ground. and we can think of standing your ground in the negative, but i ask you today to flip that coin and make stand your ground a positive ring for all of us who believe in freedom and justice and equality, that we stand firm on the ground that we have already made and be sure that nothing is taken away from us because there are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom. and i ask you today will you allow that to happen? take the words "stand your ground" in a positive sense. stand your ground in terms
i frequently tell my washington colleagues -- everything is bigger in texas but me. if you can't see me, you can at least hear me. i was delighted to accept the invitation to speak before the bipartisan policy center for a couple of reasons. number one is because of the outstanding work you have done in the housing arena and number two, i live about re-miles from here so it took me about seven minutes to get here. as a fairly new chairman of a standing committee of congress, i have a number of speaking invitations that come my way. a lot of press is interested in speaking to me me but i assure you, i don't have to work to remain humble. i accept the number of them and my home, i was working on one of those speeches after dinner and my wife who helps keep me humble, comes into my study and says -- ok, in washington, you made me mr. chairman but in dallas, you are mr. dishwasher and they are not getting any cleaner. i took my wife's subtle hand and dropped the speech and went into the kitchen and began to work on the dishes. a few minutes later, the phone rings and she picked it up and
gathered in washington, d.c. again. former presidents, celebrities and every day americans were there. >> near two weeks, firefighters are till fighting that fire out in california. we'll have the latest news coming up at 11:00 here on aljazeera. ♪ theme ♪ theme >> as the u.s. may be drawing closinger to intervention in syria polls vin to show a large majority of americans oppose military action. how can the u.s. build an international coalition when its leaders can't build one here at home? also, twitter, google and "the new york times" websites suffer cyber attacks. a group connected to the syrian government is the likely culprit. how vulnerable is america's cyber infra structure to another attack. >> the women who worked side by side with the men during the civil movement the were given their proper due. >> we begin with syria, and how an attack that seemed eminent may be less so now. president obama it is he hasn't yet decided to take action. while britain, france and turkey are open to military intervention, the u.n. and arab league are far from a consensus. as we report, ave
. seven blacks and six whites left washington, d.c. on two buses they headed south. at first, only minor hostility greeted them. but when one bus arrived in birmingham alabama, a mob surrounded them and beat the freedom fighters. >> i was on the greyhound, that was the bus they set on fire. burned it. and we would have all burned to death had it not been for the fact that one of the fuel tanks of the bus exploded, scared the hell out of the mob. >> reporter: that ride ended abruptly and the riders feared the violence would snuff out the movement. the first ride was not the last. students willing to face death picked up the cause boarding buses heading south. in his san francisco home, frank nelson shares his story with blankenhide. nelson took his first ride in june, by then the movement had spread to trains. >> they got off the train and headed to the homes that were right there. the black riders went into the whites homes and they were carted off to jail. >> reporter: nelson was 23 when his body was bruised and beaten. >> friend, i'm a mississippi segragist and i'm proud of it. >> repo
washington. helping to kick off our special coverage, chris matthews, host of msnbc "hardball" is live in washington, d.c. at the lincoln memorial and where all of today's event will take place. chris, good morning. let's set the scene for everybody. as we understand the program for today, we have three presidents, a host and current and former future civil rights and leaders and politicians taking the stage. truly a diverse program but we all look back 50 years ago to those vivid images that still inspire today. >> thomas, this is going to be a hot day. it's not that hot. it's sweltering today but not as bad as it could get in washington. it's drizzling and may clear up. i expect there is heated rhetoric today. this country is divideded right now, heavily and sharply divided between the one reject an african-american president and rejected him from the day he was elected and the day they heard he might be elected. the other half of the country almost pouting with this illusion right now. gee whiz. why isn't this greater? pef an african-american president and things not happen
and what is next for the controversial site in nevada tomorrow morning on c-span's "washington journal." thank you for joining us on this sunday. hope you enjoyed the rest of your weekend. "newsmakers" is next. have a great weekend. ♪ >> today on c-span, the ceo of" with heritage for american action, michael needham. john mccainlls with a nancy pelosi. ourelcome to "newsmakers" guest is michael needham. the ceo of heritage action for america. it was founded three years ago. thanks for being our guest. let me introduce our reporters. bob cusack is the managing editor of the hill. .> let's go right to obama care this is the issue that is facing the gop. why do you think republicans can do this? before republicans have funded obama care. the election did not fix much. --may have the democratic the only have democratic control. >> for the last three or four years republicans were all elected on the promise to get rid of obamacare and have relied on someone else coming in and saving the day. the supreme court will come in and rule it unconstitutional. the american people are going
our march on washington conversation series, as a father and son reflect on what that event has young people were found with courage and some often radical symptoms, i wouldn't have the >> ifill: and we close with the story of army staff sergeant ty michael carter, who received the nation's highest military honor today for his bravery druing the war on afghanistan. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the united states insisted today it is "undeniable" that syria's rulers gassed their own people last week, just outside damascus. that was coupled with new warnings of repercussions yet to opportun
is. the sale of "the washington post" is a tricky matter for the si single reason it is an original source of knowing what you and i should know about. and that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "all in with chris hayes" starts right now. >>> good evening from new york. i am in for are the great chris hayes. tonight on "all in" the sale of "the washington post" yesterday to billionaire jeff besos. i have thoughts and even feelings about all this since i actually work there. that is coming up. also tonight president obama makes a return to phoenix to talk about the great american dream of owning your own home. i submit homeownership isn't for everybody. it shouldn't be tax deductible. but first, did anything really interesting happen where you worked yesterday? >> the "the post" has been sold to jeff besos. >> every graham, not the only everybody but at the top of "the washington post" company had the same reaction when they started to think about the possibility which was great surprise. it was good for "the post. "we knew we could keep "the post" alive. our aspiration
'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. reince priebus is on the warpath again. the rnc chairman who has made bones trying to suppress african-american votes now has a plan to suppress the free media. having waged war on the 15th amendment, the one that gave african-americans the right to vote, he is now batting down the hatches on a free press. priebus's plan, which he described last night is to take control of the republican nominating process, deciding who will be the moderators of the debates, which debates will be authorized and which networks will be allowed to sponsor them. he, reince priebus will henceforth decide who gets to moderate the debates, where they will be permitted and which networks will be given the privilege of sponsoring them. he reince priebus will decide this big push for personal control is consistent with his oversight of a major republican plan to make it harder for minorities, the elderly and young voters to cast ballots. having loaded people down with more document requirements, voter photo i.d. cards and the rest and few opportunit
to this country. have done great damage to the american culture. to the american psyche. >> washington doesn't want to find a -- 1/6 of the economy is gone. the government took it. i don't think the rest of the world is enamored with obama. i love radio. radio is the single greatest opportunity i have to be who i am. >> rush limbaugh on the record. and you hear rush say things you never heard him say before. but first, in our one-on-one interview, rush limbaugh tells us what he thinks of president obama's phony scandal campaign. >> let me ask you, talking about the scandals, president obama says the scandals are phony. why do you thinkhe says they're phony? because he believes it or is there a strategy? >> there's a strategy. i've been troubled by something with the obama i playfully call it the regime as i know it irritates him. it is much like a regime. i've been troubled, i've been amazed. here is a man whose policies have done great damage to this country. policies have done great damage to the economy. have done great damage to the american culture, to the american psyche. i mean, there
"politicsnation" starts right now with reverend al sharpton live from washington, d.c. rev, that had to be one heck of a day in american history to be a part of that. >> no, i was very honored to be part of it. it was an exciting day, a great day. we're going to talk about it on "politicsnation," ed. and you did a great job saturday at the march. we really enjoyed you. you have a little preacher in you. >> i do. i haven't unleashed it all yet, rev. >> all right. all right. >> "politicsnation" starts right now here on msnbc. rev, take it away. >> all right. thank you, ed. thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, the dream lives on 50 years after dr. martin luther king jr. inspired the nation. america's first african-american president reminded us -- reminded all of us that today's economic inequities mean there's still much more work to do. i was there for the day's commemoration as some 100,000 people gathered to hear more than 200 speakers. everyone from former presidents, carter and clinton, to activists and civil rights leaders. at points there was a spontaneous song
the new york time yesterday and also washington post and as you said, a lot of social media and other important media in the western world -- >> it's getting worse. the problem is that they are not even that sophisticated, i mean, in fact, we saw how -- we know that some of them are what we call -- they do not launch complex attacks, but those attacks are out there launching and working. that's my big concern now. >> we've heard for years that cyber attacks could take out power grids, financial markets, banks and officials have done drills and simulated attacks. we're going to show you one called cyber shock wave, produced by the bipartisan policy center, including a whole officials. >> the country's internet system is now slowing down to a virtual crawl. communications with financial trading houses are almost at a stand still. >> it is an active war. you turn off everybody's cell phone, you don't allow them to bank, work, communicate be this is an attack on the united states. it may not be a bomb, but it's much more significant than a bomb going off. >> scary simulation there. what s
on anniversary of the march on washington, and the legacy of martin luther king jr.. series, first ladies, influence and image. over the next couple of hours, we will visit places with history curators. away fighting the revolutionary war, martha washington ran their plantation. >> it is clear that martha arrived at mount vernon in 1859 and there was a lot of management that she had to do. when she married george washington, she brings with her to mount vernon 12 housemates. that is really almost unimaginable luxury. these are slaves that are for the most part, not field labor, not producing crops, which is where your income is coming from. they are doing things like cooking, serving at table, clean the house, doing the laundry, doing selling, this is not productive labor in the sense that it is not productive income. she brings them with her and she brings financial resources to the marriage as well as her managerial skills. it makes mount vernon a successful operation and it makes it possible for washington to be away for eight years fighting a war. the fact that he has this support sys
-perry. live this morning from washington, d.c. where thousands of people turned out to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the march on washington for jobs and freedom yesterday. only one man who spoke from the steps of the lincoln memorial five decades ago remains alive today, congressman john lewis, and he spoke forcefully. >> i got arrested 40 times during the '60s, beaten, left bloody and unconscious. but i'm not tired, i'm not weary. i'm not prepared to sit down and give up. i am ready to fight and continue the fight, and you must fight. >> although the architect of the march has passed away, many of the inequities that prompted the struggle remain firmly in place. in 1963 the march called for equal access to jobs, fair wages, unfettered voting rights and intraracial segregation, access to decent health care, schools, housing. half a century later the struggle continues. the struggle continues for decent work and humane conditions that pays a living wage of the nationwide unemployment rate is 7.4%. for african-americans it's 12.6%. for young african-american men between 20 and 24 the u
. >> so what's the president doing? four speeches in seven days. >> if folks in washington really want a grand bargain, how about a grand bargain for middle class jobs? >> but while washington waits for a bargain, millions of american workers feel they're getting a raw deal. fast food workers across the country who say they can't afford to live where they work, walking off the job to demand higher wages. now the economy is adding jobs, but those new jobs pay less than the ones lost during the recession. the president worries the growing income gap will fray america's social fabric. even the good news isn't as good as it seems. amazon adding 5,000 warehouse jobs. the company's warehouse workers take home just $24,000 a year, barely above the poverty line. america may still be the land of opportunity, but those opportunities pay less and less. in brazil, in greece, in france, we've seen protesters take to the streets in those countries demanding economic reform, demanding workers' rights, financial fairness. in short, a better life. could we see that kind of fervor here in the united sta
be the secretary of dhs is the most thankless job in washington. that is not true. no doubt, it is a very big and comics job. it is literally a 24/7 job, that as my successor will soon learn, it is also one of the most rewarding jobs there is. what you do hear matters to the lives of people all across our great nation him and your decisions affect them in direct and tangible ways. you make sure their families are safe from terrorist threats, that their local first responders have equipment and training and funding, and that when disaster strikes people who have lost everything are given food and shelter and hope. and that thanks for that is not owed any single individual or cabinet secretary, but to that 240,000 dhs employees, many of whom work in tough conditions around the clock to accomplish our shared and noble mission, and that includes some who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. they are the backbone of your nation's homeland security, and over the past 4 1/2 years, it has been my pleasure to serve with them and build a more agile department of homeland security. i thank
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,381 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)